Laws

Electric Bikes Laws USA: State-by-State E-Bike Rules Explained

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The evolving landscape of mobility has ushered in a surge of interest in electric bicycles, or e-bikes, across the United States.

As these electrically-assisted bicycles become increasingly popular, it’s important to navigate the various laws and regulations that govern their use. This includes both federal guidelines and state-specific legislation, as these laws can differ significantly from one state to another.

In this article, we’ll aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the current laws and regulations regarding e-bikes across the 50 states.

First though, we’ll take a look at the broader electric bike laws in USA (i.e. the federal rules), before taking a look at each state.

Disclaimer

This guide should serve as a general overview and not legal advice. E-bike laws can vary and are subject to change. For the most accurate information, consult with your state’s Department of Transportation or seek legal counsel. As e-bike users, it’s our duty to stay informed and ensure safety for all.

Federal E-Bike Laws (USA)

  1. Federal definition of E-Bikes: According to the CPSC, an electric bicycle is classified as a “low-speed electric bicycle” if it has a fully operable pedal, no more than two wheels, and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), and whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is no more than 20 mph.
  2. The CPSC stipulates that e-bikes meeting their definition are considered bicycles, not motor vehicles. So they are exempt from licensing, registration, and driving restrictions on roads where bicycles are permitted.

However, after these federal guidelines, it becomes complex, as the regulation of e-bikes falls largely to states, which have adopted a wide range of rules. Some states follow the three-class system:

  • Class 1: E-bikes that are pedal-assist only, with no throttle, and have a maximum assisted speed of 20 mph.
  • Class 2: E-bikes that also have a maximum speed of 20 mph, but are throttle-assisted.
  • Class 3: E-bikes that are pedal-assist only, with no throttle, and a maximum assisted speed of 28 mph.

Electric Bike Laws by State

Alabama Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Alabama does not differentiate e-bikes from motor vehicles. An e-bike is generally treated as a motor vehicle under state law.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Helmets are required for all riders under the age of 16, as Alabama law requires helmets for all riders of motor vehicles under this age.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific minimum age requirement defined in state law to ride an e-bike, but riders are generally subject to the same rules as motor vehicle operators.
  4. Equipment Requirements: As e-bikes are treated as motor vehicles, they must comply with the same equipment standards defined for motor vehicles in the state.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes, being considered similar to motor vehicles, are allowed to be ridden on streets and highways where motor vehicles are permitted.
  6. Licensing and Registration: Because e-bikes are considered motor vehicles, they require a valid driver’s license to operate, and the vehicle likely needs to be registered.

Alaska Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Alaska does not differentiate e-bikes from traditional bicycles in state law.
  2. Helmet Requirement: No state law requires helmets for e-bike riders, though local rules may differ and safety is highly encouraged.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific age requirement defined in state law to ride an e-bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements: As e-bikes are treated the same as traditional bicycles, they must comply with the same equipment standards such as reflectors and lights when ridden in low-light conditions.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally permitted anywhere traditional bicycles are allowed, including bike paths and public roads, unless local laws specify otherwise.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate.

It’s important to note that these details are based on the last available data and the actual situation may have changed. For the most accurate and updated rules, consult the Alaska Department of Transportation or local law enforcement agencies.

Arizona Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 e-bikes are all considered bicycles under Arizona law, provided they have pedals and a maximum motor power of 750 watts.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Arizona requires all riders under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while operating a bicycle, including e-bikes.
  3. Age Limit: E-bike riders must be at least 16 years old.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Arizona does not have specific equipment requirements for electric bikes (e-bikes) beyond the standard requirements for bicycles: brakes, lights, reflectors, bell or horn, handlebars, and seat.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed in bicycle lanes and on multi-use paths unless explicitly restricted by local regulations.
    • E-bikes are not allowed on non-motorized trails in national parks and federal lands unless specifically designated as open to motorized use.
  6. Licensing and Registration: Riders are not required to have a driver’s license, registration, or insurance for Class 1, 2, or 3 E-bikes.

Please note that laws and regulations may change over time, and it is essential to check with local authorities and the Arizona Department of Transportation for the most up-to-date information regarding e-bike laws in Arizona.

Arkansas Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Electric bikes are classified into three categories based on their maximum assisted speed and motor wattage:
    • Class 1: Pedal-assist e-bikes with a maximum speed of 20 mph and a motor wattage of up to 750 watts.
    • Class 2: E-bikes with a throttle and a maximum speed of 20 mph, also with a motor wattage of up to 750 watts.
    • Class 3: Pedal-assist e-bikes with a maximum speed of 28 mph and a motor wattage of up to 750 watts.
  2. Helmet Requirement: There is no specific information about helmet requirements for electric bikes in Arkansas, it’s generally recommended or required for all cyclists to wear helmets, especially for safety.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating e-bikes in Arkansas. However, individuals under 16 years old must wear a helmet while riding.
  4. Equipment Requirements: E-bikes in Arkansas are subject to the same equipment requirements as traditional bicycles. These requirements include having a functional braking system, front and rear lights when riding at night, and reflectors on the front, rear, pedals, and sides.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes are generally allowed where traditional bicycles are permitted, such as on roads, bike lanes, and multi-use paths. However, there might be certain restrictions in specific areas or trails.
  6. Licensing and Registration: In Arkansas, there are no specific licensing or registration requirements for electric bikes.

California Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classifications: California law categorizes e-bikes into three classes based on their maximum assisted speed and motor power:
    • Class 1: Pedal-assisted electric bicycles with a maximum speed of 20 mph and a motor power of up to 750 watts.
    • Class 2: Electric bicycles with a maximum speed of 20 mph but can be propelled solely by the motor (no pedaling required). The motor power should not exceed 750 watts.
    • Class 3: Pedal-assisted electric bicycles with a maximum speed of 28 mph and a motor power of up to 750 watts.
  2. Age Restrictions: Riders of Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes must be at least 16 years old. However, Class 3 e-bikes are only permitted for riders who are 18 years or older.
  3. Helmet Requirement: Riders of all classes of e-bikes are required to wear helmets if they are under 18 years old.
  4. Speed Limits: E-bike riders must adhere to the speed limits applicable to bicycles on public roads, paths, and trails. In California, the general speed limit for bicycles is typically 15 mph unless otherwise posted.
  5. Local Regulations: Different cities and counties in California may have additional regulations or restrictions on the use of e-bikes. It’s important to check local laws or ordinances to ensure compliance.
  6. Bicycle Infrastructure: E-bikes are generally allowed on bicycle paths, lanes, and trails, unless specific local regulations prohibit their use.
  7. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration, license plates, or a driver’s license.

Please note that laws can vary, and it’s crucial to refer to the official California Vehicle Code (CVC) or consult with local authorities to obtain the most accurate and up-to-date information regarding e-bike regulations in California.

Colorado Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classifications: Colorado law divides electric bikes into three classes, depending on their maximum speed and power capabilities.
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Age Restrictions: Riders under 16 years old are not allowed to operate class 3 electric bikes on public roads or paths.
  3. Helmet Requirements: Riders under 18 years old are required to wear a helmet when operating electric bikes.
  4. Traffic Laws: Electric bike riders must follow the same traffic laws as traditional bicycle riders in Colorado.
  5. Bike Lane Usage: Electric bikes are typically allowed in bike lanes unless local regulations state otherwise.
  6. Bike Path Usage: Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are generally allowed on bike paths in Colorado, but Class 3 electric bikes may be restricted in some areas.
  7. Maximum Speed Limit: Electric bikes in Colorado are generally limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph for Class 1 and Class 2, and 28 mph for Class 3.

Connecticut Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Connecticut classifies electric bikes based on their motor power and maximum speed.
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Age Restrictions: Connecticut law allows anyone 16 years old and above to operate all classes of electric bikes.
  3. Helmet Requirements: While Connecticut law does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety.
  4. Traffic Laws: Electric bike riders must follow the same traffic laws as traditional bicycle riders in Connecticut.
  5. Bike Lane Usage: Electric bikes are generally allowed in bike lanes in Connecticut unless local regulations state otherwise.
  6. Bike Path Usage: Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are typically allowed on bike paths in the state, but Class 3 electric bikes may be restricted in some areas.
  7. Maximum Speed Limit: Electric bikes in Connecticut are generally limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph for Class 1 and Class 2, and 28 mph for Class 3.

Delaware Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Delaware classifies electric bikes based on their motor power and maximum speed.
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Age Restrictions: Delaware law allows anyone 16 years old and above to operate all classes of electric bikes.
  3. Helmet Requirements: Delaware requires all electric bike riders under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while operating the bike.
  4. Traffic Laws: Electric bike riders must follow the same traffic laws as traditional bicycle riders in Delaware.
  5. Bike Lane Usage: Electric bikes are generally allowed in bike lanes in Delaware unless local regulations state otherwise.
  6. Bike Path Usage: Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are usually permitted on bike paths in the state, but Class 3 electric bikes may be restricted in some areas.
  7. Maximum Speed Limit: Electric bikes in Delaware are typically limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph for Class 1 and Class 2, and 28 mph for Class 3.

Please remember that local laws and regulations can vary, and it’s crucial to check with your local municipality or the Delaware Department of Transportation for specific rules and requirements related to electric bikes in your area.

Florida Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Florida classifies electric bikes as “Electric Bicycle” or “Electric Bicycle Kit.” According to Florida law, an electric bicycle is defined as a bicycle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts, while an electric bicycle kit is an electric motor that can be added to a conventional bicycle.
  2. Age Restrictions: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bicycles in Florida. Anyone of any age can ride an electric bike.
  3. Driver’s License: Florida law does not require a driver’s license to operate an electric bicycle.
  4. Helmet Requirements: While Florida law does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  5. Traffic Laws: Electric bike riders must follow the same traffic laws as traditional bicycle riders in Florida.
  6. Bike Lane Usage: Electric bikes are generally allowed in bike lanes in Florida unless local regulations state otherwise.
  7. Bike Path Usage: Electric bikes are generally permitted on bike paths in Florida. However, local regulations may vary, so it’s essential to check for any specific restrictions in your area.
  8. Maximum Speed Limit: There is no specific maximum speed limit for electric bikes in Florida. However, electric bikes are not allowed to exceed the speed limits for regular bicycles on bike paths, trails, or multi-use paths.

Please remember that local laws and regulations can vary, and it’s crucial to check with your local municipality or the Florida Department of Transportation for specific rules and requirements related to electric bikes in your area.

Georgia Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Georgia does not have specific classifications for electric bikes, but they are generally treated as bicycles with electric assist.
  2. Motor Power and Maximum Speed: Georgia law allows electric bikes with a motor of up to 750 watts and a maximum speed of 20 mph to be considered as bicycles.
  3. Age Restrictions: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Georgia. Anyone of any age can ride an electric bike.
  4. Helmet Requirements: While Georgia law does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  5. Traffic Laws: Electric bike riders must follow the same traffic laws as traditional bicycle riders in Georgia.
  6. Where to ride:
    • Electric bikes are generally allowed in bike lanes in Georgia unless local regulations state otherwise.
    • Electric bikes are generally permitted on bike paths in Georgia. However, local regulations may vary, so it’s essential to check for any specific restrictions in your area.
  7. DUI Laws: Georgia law prohibits operating an electric bike under the influence of drugs or alcohol. If an electric bike rider is found to be intoxicated, they may be subject to DUI laws.
  8. Licensing and Registration: Georgia law does not require a driver’s license to operate an electric bike.

Local laws and regulations can vary, and it’s crucial to check with your local municipality or the Georgia Department of Transportation for specific rules and requirements related to electric bikes in your area.

Hawaii Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Hawaii classifies electric bikes based on their motor power and maximum speed into three classes:
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Hawaii law requires all electric bike riders under the age of 16 to wear a helmet. For riders above 16, helmet use is not mandatory but strongly recommended for safety.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Hawaii. However, it’s recommended to check with local regulations or safety guidelines for any additional restrictions, especially for young riders.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Electric bikes in Hawaii must be equipped with operable pedals and comply with the specifications of the respective class classification (Class 1, Class 2, or Class 3).
  5. Where to Ride: Hawaii generally allows electric bikes on bike paths, multi-use paths, and public roads. However, specific rules and restrictions may vary depending on the jurisdiction and the specific type of electric bike (Class 1, 2, or 3). It’s essential to check local laws and regulations for any area-specific restrictions.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Hawaii does not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes. Electric bikes are generally treated as bicycles, and traditional bicycle laws apply.

Please remember that laws and regulations can change over time, and it’s crucial to check with your local municipality or the Hawaii Department of Transportation for the most up-to-date rules and requirements related to electric bikes in your area.

Idaho Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Idaho law classifies electric bikes based on their motor power and maximum speed into three classes:
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Idaho law requires all electric bike riders under the age of 18 to wear a helmet. For riders above 18, helmet use is not mandatory but strongly recommended for safety.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Idaho. Anyone of any age can ride an electric bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Idaho requires electric bikes to have fully operable pedals and an electric motor of 750 watts or less to be considered bicycles.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes classified as bicycles in Idaho are generally allowed on roadways, bike lanes, and multi-use paths where traditional bicycles are permitted. However, specific rules and restrictions may vary depending on local regulations, so it’s essential to check for any area-specific restrictions.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Idaho does not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes that meet the criteria of bicycles. They are treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

Illinois Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Illinois law defines electric bicycles as “low-speed electric bicycles” (LSEBs) and classifies them based on their motor power and maximum speed:
    • Low-Speed Electric Bicycles (LSEBs): Electric bikes equipped with a motor of less than 750 watts and capable of reaching speeds up to 20 mph without assistance.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Illinois law does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders. However, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Illinois. Anyone of any age can ride a low-speed electric bicycle.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Low-speed electric bicycles in Illinois must be equipped with pedals, a motor of 750 watts or less, and have a maximum speed of 20 mph without assistance.
  5. Where to Ride: In Illinois, low-speed electric bicycles are generally allowed on roadways where bicycles are permitted. However, it’s essential to check local regulations and restrictions, as some municipalities may have additional rules regarding electric bike usage on specific paths or trails.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Illinois does not require a driver’s license or registration for operating low-speed electric bicycles. They are treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

It’s crucial to check with your local municipality or the Illinois Department of Transportation for the most up-to-date rules and requirements related to electric bikes in your area as laws and regulations may change from over time.

Indiana Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Indiana law classifies electric bikes as bicycles if they meet certain criteria. Generally, electric bikes that have operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts are considered bicycles.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Indiana does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders. However, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Indiana. Anyone of any age can ride an electric bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements: To be classified as a bicycle in Indiana, an electric bike must have fully operable pedals and a motor with a power output of 750 watts or less.
  5. Where to Ride: Electric bikes classified as bicycles in Indiana are generally allowed on roadways and bike paths where traditional bicycles are permitted. However, specific rules may vary depending on local regulations, so it’s essential to check for any area-specific restrictions.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Indiana does not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes that meet the criteria of bicycles. They are treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

Iowa Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Iowa law classifies electric bikes based on their motor power and maximum speed into three classes:
    • Class 1: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 2: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that can propel the bike without pedaling but stops assisting when the bike reaches 20 mph.
    • Class 3: Electric bikes equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling and stops assisting when the bike reaches 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Iowa does not have a statewide helmet requirement for electric bike riders. However, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Iowa. Anyone of any age can ride an electric bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements: To be considered as bicycles, electric bikes in Iowa must have fully operable pedals and an electric motor with a maximum power output of 750 watts.
  5. Where to Ride: Electric bikes classified as bicycles in Iowa are generally allowed on roadways, bike lanes, and multi-use paths where traditional bicycles are permitted. However, specific rules and restrictions may vary depending on local regulations, so it’s essential to check for any area-specific restrictions.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Iowa does not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes that meet the criteria of bicycles. They are treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

Kansas Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Kansas generally treats electric bikes as bicycles if they meet the following criteria:
    • Electric bikes must have operable pedals.
    • The electric motor’s maximum power output should not exceed 1,000 watts (1 kW).
    • The electric motor must not assist the rider when traveling at speeds above 20 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Kansas does not have a statewide helmet requirement for bicycle riders, but it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Kansas. However, it’s essential to follow age-appropriate safety guidelines for children riding electric bikes.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Electric bikes must have the necessary equipment required for bicycles, such as brakes, lights, and reflectors, to be legally operated on Kansas roads.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes classified as bicycles in Kansas are generally allowed on roadways, bike lanes, and multi-use paths where traditional bicycles are permitted.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Kansas did not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes that meet the criteria of bicycles. They were treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

To ensure compliance with the most up-to-date laws and regulations related to electric bikes in Kansas, it’s crucial to verify the information through official government sources or consult legal experts.

Kentucky Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Kentucky typically treats electric bikes as bicycles if they meet the following criteria:
    • Electric bikes must have operable pedals.
    • The electric motor’s maximum power output should not exceed 1,000 watts (1 kW).
    • The electric motor must not assist the rider when traveling at speeds above 20 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Kentucky does not have a statewide helmet requirement for bicycle riders, but it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety, especially for children.
  3. Age Limit: There are no specific age restrictions for operating electric bikes in Kentucky. However, it’s essential to follow age-appropriate safety guidelines for children riding electric bikes.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Electric bikes must have the necessary equipment required for bicycles, such as brakes, lights, and reflectors, to be legally operated on Kentucky roads.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes classified as bicycles in Kentucky are generally allowed on roadways, bike lanes, and multi-use paths where traditional bicycles are permitted.
  6. Licensing and Registration: As of my last update, Kentucky did not require a driver’s license or registration for operating electric bikes that meet the criteria of bicycles. They were treated similarly to traditional bicycles under the law.

Louisiana Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification:
    • Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes: Louisiana considers Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes as bicycles. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedalling.
    • The motor of the electric bike should have a power rating of no more than 750 watts (1 horsepower).
  2. Maximum speed: In general, electric bikes in Louisiana are allowed to have a maximum speed of up to 20 mph when using the motor power alone.
  3. Age Limit: There may be no specific age restrictions for electric bike riders but it’s advisable to check for local helmet laws that apply to cyclists.
  4. Where to Ride: Electric bikes are typically permitted on bike lanes, bike paths, and roads where regular bicycles are allowed.
  5. Licensing: A driver’s license may not be required to operate an electric bike in Louisiana.

Maine Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes: Maine considers Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes as bicycles. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling.
  2. Age Limit: There may be no specific age restrictions for electric bike riders.
  3. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes are typically permitted on bike lanes, bike paths, and roads where regular bicycles are allowed.
    • Local regulations may vary, but in general, electric bikes should not be ridden on sidewalks unless permitted by local ordinances.
  4. Licensing and Registration: Electric bikes are not required to be registered, and riders do not need a driver’s license to operate them.

Maryland Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: 
    • Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 e-bikes: Maryland recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
    • The motor of the electric bike should have a power rating of no more than 750 watts (1 horsepower).
  2. Maximum speed: Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are generally allowed to have a maximum speed of up to 20 mph when using the motor power alone. Class 3 e-bikes can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  3. Rider Age Limit and Helmet Requirement: There may be no specific age restrictions for electric bike riders, but it’s advisable to check for local helmet laws that apply to cyclists.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes are typically permitted on bike lanes, bike paths, and roads where regular bicycles are allowed.
    • Local regulations may vary, but in general, electric bikes should not be ridden on sidewalks unless permitted by local ordinances.
  6. Licensing and Registration: Electric bikes are not required to be registered, and riders do not need a driver’s license to operate them.

Massachusetts Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 e-bikes: Massachusetts recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Helmets are strongly recommended for all cyclists, regardless of age, for safety reasons.
  3. Age Limit: For riders above the age of 16, there is no specific age restriction for operating electric bikes in Massachusetts. However, it’s essential to comply with all other relevant laws and regulations regarding electric bikes, including speed limits and where they are allowed to operate.
  4. Maximum speed: Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are generally allowed to have a maximum speed of up to 20 mph when using the motor power alone. Class 3 e-bikes can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes are generally allowed on public roads, bike lanes, paths, multi-use trails, state parks, and municipal areas in Massachusetts. Obey local rules and traffic laws.
  6. Licensing and Registration: Electric bikes are not required to be registered, and riders do not need a driver’s license to operate them.

Michigan Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 e-bikes: Michigan recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Michigan law requires riders under the age of 19 to wear a helmet while operating a bicycle, including electric bikes.
  3. Age Limit: While there is no specific minimum age for operating an electric bike, it’s essential to prioritize safety and ensure that young riders are supervised and capable of responsibly operating the vehicle.
  4. Equipment Requirements: The motor of the electric bike should have a power rating of no more than 750 watts (1 horsepower).
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Electric bikes are typically permitted on bike lanes, bike paths, and roads where regular bicycles are allowed. However, some areas may have specific restrictions, so it’s crucial to be aware of local regulations.
    • Local regulations may vary, but in general, electric bikes should not be ridden on sidewalks unless permitted by local ordinances.
  6. Licensing and Registration: Electric bikes are not required to be registered, and riders do not need a driver’s license to operate them.

Minnesota Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification:
    • Class 1: E-bikes that provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling and ceases to assist when reaching 20 mph.
    • Class 2: E-bikes that have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling and also have a maximum speed of 20 mph.
    • Class 3: E-bikes that provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling and ceases to assist when reaching 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Minnesota law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, it’s highly recommended to wear a helmet for safety.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific statewide age limit for operating an e-bike in Minnesota. However, young riders are subject to bicycle helmet laws, which require riders under the age of 18 to wear a helmet while operating a bicycle or e-bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes must be equipped with a working pedal system.
    • Class 3 e-bikes must be labeled with a manufacturer’s label indicating its maximum speed.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed wherever traditional bicycles are permitted in Minnesota. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: No license or registration is required to operate an e-bike in Minnesota.

Mississippi Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Mississippi may recognize Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Mississippi law may not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: There may not be a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes in Mississippi. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are typically allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Mississippi. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in Mississippi.

Missouri Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Missouri may recognize Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Missouri law may not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Missouri does not have a specific statewide age limit for e-bike operation. However, young riders should adhere to bicycle helmet laws that may mandate helmet usage for cyclists below a certain age.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Missouri. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in Missouri.

Montana Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Montana may recognize Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Montana law may not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Montana may not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Montana. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in Montana.

Nebraska Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Nebraska generally recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Nebraska law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Nebraska law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Nebraska. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in Nebraska.

Nevada Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Nevada typically recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Nevada law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: No specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes in Nevada. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Nevada. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require licensing or registration in Nevada in most cases.

New Hampshire Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: New Hampshire may recognize Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: New Hampshire law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: New Hampshire law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride: E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in New Hampshire. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration:
    • In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in New Hampshire.

New Jersey Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification:
    • New Jersey recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
      • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
      • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
      • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: New Jersey law requires all e-bike riders under the age of 17 to wear a helmet.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes in New Jersey. However, riders under 17 years old must wear a helmet.
  4. Equipment Requirements: E-bikes must have operable pedals.
  5. Where to Ride: E-bikes are generally allowed on roads, streets, bike lanes, and bike paths in New Jersey.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate.
  7. Speed Limit: E-bikes in New Jersey are limited to a maximum speed of 28 mph when using motor power.

New Mexico Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: New Mexico generally recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: New Mexico law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders.
  3. Age Limit: New Mexico law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and bells, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in New Mexico. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Licensing and Registration:
    • In most cases, e-bikes do not require licensing or registration in New Mexico.

New York Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: New York law classifies electric bikes into three categories:
    • Class 1: E-bikes that are pedal-assist only, with no throttle, and a maximum assisted speed of 20 mph.
    • Class 2: E-bikes that have a maximum speed of 20 mph, but are throttle-assisted.
    • Class 3: E-bikes that are pedal-assist only, with no throttle, and a maximum assisted speed of 25 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Helmets are required for riders of all classes of e-bikes under the age of 18. Riders aged 18 and over are required to wear a helmet when operating a class 3 e-bike.
  3. Age Limit: There is no minimum age for Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes, but riders of Class 3 e-bikes must be at least 16 years old.
  4. Equipment Requirements: Class 3 e-bikes are required to have a bell or other audible signal.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • Class 1 and Class 2 e-bikes are allowed on any streets, highways, parking lots, and area designated for the operation of bicycles.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are not allowed on bike paths unless specifically permitted by a local ordinance but can ride in bike lanes on public roads.
  6. Licensing and Registration: No special license or registration is required to ride an e-bike.

North Carolina Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification:
    • North Carolina typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
      • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
      • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
      • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: North Carolina law requires all e-bike riders under the age of 16 to wear a helmet.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes in North Carolina. However, riders under 16 years old must wear a helmet.
  4. Equipment Requirements: E-bikes must have a functional pedal system.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on roads, streets, bike lanes, and bike paths in North Carolina.
  6. Speed Limit: E-bikes in North Carolina are limited to a maximum speed of 28 mph when using the motor power.
  7. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in North Carolina.

North Dakota Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: North Dakota generally recognizes Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3 electric bikes. Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only, while Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle and can be propelled without pedaling. Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: No specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders but it’s strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders.
  3. Age Limit: there is no specific statewide age requirement to wear a helmet for e-bike riders in North Dakota. However, it is highly recommended for all cyclists, regardless of age, to wear a helmet while riding an e-bike or any type of bicycle.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and reflectors, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in North Dakota. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Speed Limit: E-bikes in North Dakota are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph on motor power.
  7. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in North Dakota.

Ohio Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Ohio typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Ohio law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Ohio law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and reflectors, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Ohio. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Ohio are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  7. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Ohio.

Oklahoma Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Ohio typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Ohio law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Ohio law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • Specific equipment requirements, such as lights and reflectors, may follow standard bicycle regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Ohio. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  6. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Ohio are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  7. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Ohio.

Oregon Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Oregon recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Oregon law requires all e-bike riders under the age of 16 to wear a helmet.
  3. Age Limit: There is no specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes in Oregon. However, riders under 16 years old must wear a helmet.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Oregon. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
    • E-bike riders in Oregon must use bike lanes or paths when available and should use the rightmost lane when riding on roads.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Oregon are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Oregon.
  7. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • E-bikes must have a permanently attached label indicating the bike’s classification, top assisted speed, and motor wattage.
  8. Electric Scooters: Electric scooters with handlebars are considered electric bikes if they meet the state’s e-bike classification and equipment requirements.

Pennsylvania Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Pennsylvania recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Pennsylvania law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Pennsylvania law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on roads, streets, bike lanes, and bike paths in Pennsylvania.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Pennsylvania are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Pennsylvania.
  7. Equipment Requirements:
    • E-bikes should be equipped with a functional pedal system.
    • E-bikes must have a permanently attached label indicating the bike’s classification, top assisted speed, and motor wattage.

Rhode Island Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Rhode Island typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Rhode Island law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Rhode Island law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Rhode Island. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Rhode Island are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Rhode Island.

South Carolina Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: South Carolina typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: South Carolina law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: South Carolina law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in South Carolina. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in South Carolina are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in South Carolina.

South Dakota Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: South Dakota typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: South Dakota law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: South Dakota law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in South Dakota. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in South Dakota are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in South Dakota.

Tennessee Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Tennessee typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Tennessee law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Tennessee law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Tennessee. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Tennessee are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Tennessee.

Texas Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Texas does not differentiate e-bikes based on classes like some states. An e-bike is defined as a bike equipped with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts.
  2. Helmet Requirement: There is no state law requiring helmet use for e-bike riders, but local rules may vary.
  3. Age Limit: There is no minimum age requirement defined in state law to ride an e-bike.
  4. Equipment Requirements: E-bikes must comply with the equipment standards defined in the federal regulations.
  5. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are allowed to be ridden on streets, highways, or any other places where bicycles are permitted.
  6. Licensing and Registration: No special license or registration is required to ride an e-bike.

Utah Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Utah recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Utah law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Utah law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Utah. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
    • E-bike riders must ride as close to the right-hand side of the road as practicable, but they are not required to use bike lanes or shoulders.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Utah are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Utah.

Vermont Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Vermont recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Vermont law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Vermont law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Vermont. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
    • E-bike riders must ride as close to the right-hand side of the road as practicable, but they are not required to use bike lanes or shoulders.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Vermont are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Vermont.

Virginia Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Virginia recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Virginia law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Virginia law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Virginia. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit:
    • E-bikes in Virginia are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration:
    • E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Virginia.

Washington Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Washington recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Washington law requires all e-bike riders under the age of 16 to wear a helmet.
  3. Age Limit: Washington law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, riders under 16 years old must wear a helmet.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Washington. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
    • E-bike riders must ride as close to the right-hand side of the road as practicable, but they are not required to use bike lanes or shoulders.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Washington are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Washington.

West Virginia Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: West Virginia typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: West Virginia law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: West Virginia law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in West Virginia. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in West Virginia are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration: E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in West Virginia.

Wisconsin Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Wisconsin recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Wisconsin law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Wisconsin law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Wisconsin. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit:
    • E-bikes in Wisconsin are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration:
    • E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Wisconsin.

Wyoming Electric Bike Laws

  1. Classification: Wyoming typically recognizes three classes of electric bikes:
    • Class 1 e-bikes are pedal-assist only and provide assistance only when the rider is pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 2 e-bikes have a throttle that can propel the bike without pedaling, with a maximum speed of up to 20 mph.
    • Class 3 e-bikes are pedal-assist and can reach speeds up to 28 mph.
  2. Helmet Requirement: Wyoming law does not have a specific statewide helmet requirement for e-bike riders. However, wearing a helmet is strongly recommended for all cyclists, including e-bike riders, to prioritize safety.
  3. Age Limit: Wyoming law does not have a specific statewide age limit for operating e-bikes. However, young riders should follow bicycle helmet laws, which often require riders under a certain age to wear a helmet when cycling.
  4. Where to Ride:
    • E-bikes are generally allowed on the same paths and roads as traditional bicycles in Wyoming. This includes bike lanes, bike paths, and public roads, except where specifically prohibited.
  5. Speed Limit: E-bikes in Wyoming are limited to a maximum speed of 20 mph when using the motor power.
  6. Licensing and Registration:
    • E-bikes do not require registration or a driver’s license to operate in Wyoming.

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