Chrome Natoma 2.0 Short – Review [The Best Stylish Cycling Shorts in 2020?]

If you want to cycle in style and comfort, then what you wear over your legs is the most important consideration.

While any old t-shirt can be fine to cycle in, the same isn’t necessarily true when it comes to trousers or – for the summer months – shorts.

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This is because many trousers feature stiff materials with little give. And that’s before you even consider things like how breathable they are or the overall fit.

Of course, you don’t have to go out and buy “cycling trousers” per se. Many brands now incorporate some extra stretch into their keks these days.

So, in order to quickly determine whether a pair of trousers should be okay to cycle in, I conduct a very fast experiment.

I do… The Squat Test™.

The Squat Test™

But what is The Squat Test™!?

Well, my dear friends. Strap yourselves in…

The Squat Test™ involves me, wait for it… squatting in a new pair of trousers to see if they have enough give to let me do so without restriction

Okay, maybe a I shouldn’t have built that up so much.

I squat. If it doesn’t feel like I’m about to bust out of my pants by the seams, I dub them cyclable.

Anyway…

Stylish Cycling Shorts for Summer

Right, summer. I live in Spain and I ride my bike to my co-working space pretty much every day. That means I need a pair of shorts that will:

  1. Keep me cool
  2. Be very comfortable
  3. Look cool AF

So, with the sun on the horizon, I thought the best place to start my 2020 Discerning Cyclist Summer Short Testing was with Chrome Industries, who, let’s face it, are right up there when it comes to creating truly awesome stylish urban cycling clothes.

REVIEW: Chrome Natoma 2.0 Cycling Shorts

Available in black and “dusty olive”, the Natoma Short 2.0 has been made in a non-sense way to produce what could well be the best urban cycling shorts around for commuters.

Short shorts seem to have been creeping into fashion over the past couple of years, but I’m relied to say that the Chrome Natoma 2.0 shorts seem to have perfectly mastered the “just above the knee” cut and come in a straight leg fit. For reference, my 30R shorts are 50cm (20”) long, as you can see below.

Chrome Natoma Cycling Features

The most noticeable thing about these shorts when you put them on is just how stretchy they are. Naturally, they passed The Squat Test™ with flying colours. Indeed, Chrome confidently describe this product as a “water resistant quick dry 4-way short”. The shorts are made from a blend of 94% Nylon and 6% Spandex to produce these very lightweight, stretchy shorts.

The shorts feature your standard four pockets – two front and two back – all of which are sufficiently deep enough for even the largest of modern smartphones

The cycling goodness continues with a reinforced waist and gusset, while there’s a big reflective Chrome logo on the back to give a little of extra visibility if you’re on a late-night summer right after the bingo.

And there’s another very cool cycling feature in the form of a big old strap on the rear left of the waistband on which you can carry a good size D-lock, if you like to master the hipster vibe.

To ensure these shorts are sturdy, Chrome’s also provided a reinforced gusset with a full-length seamless double-layer crotch, as well as double welt rear pockets.

READ: 5 of the Best Urban Cycling Shorts for Commuter this Summer

Best Stylish Cycling Shorts in 2020?

In terms of style and comfort, Chrome has absolutely aced it with the Natoma 2.0 Short. You don’t want to take them off and they can absolutely handled the hottest of summer climes, and are quick drying even if you do build up a sweat.

This is a premium product so the £120 (€140/$100) is fair game. If you want what could be the best urban cycling shorts out there this summer, then the Chrome Natoma 2.0 Short might well be your first stop.

£120 / €140 / $100
8.6

Fit

9.5/10

Function

9.5/10

Style

9.5/10

Value

5.0/10

Quality

9.5/10

Pros

  • Look great
  • 4-way stretch
  • Water resistant
  • Fast drying
  • Reflective detailing

Cons

  • Pricey

Pete Reynolds

Pete is the co-founder and editor of Discerning Cyclist. He commutes by bike daily from his home to his co-working space. Originally from Wirral, UK, Pete now lives in Spain. When visiting a new city, Pete loves nothing more than to explore it on two wheels. See Pete's Muck Rack profile

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IMPORTANT NOTE: Coffee funds may be converted into beers funds on Fridays.