POLL: What do you wear on your bicycle commute?

11 Responses

  1. Denise Courtney says:

    I work in an office environment so jeans & casual clothes are not an option for me. I tend to wear my normal clothes but opt for breathable fabrics most of the time. I’ve recently invested in the perfect bike pant from @iladorawear which I love. Oh, & I cycle in heels, usually Mary Janes or trendy clog boots/shoes.

  2. Jupe says:

    Four years ago started cycling to work.
    I initially bought into the cyclist subculture fanned by ALDI offers and midlife crisis.
    It took a while to realise you don’t need to be a cyclist but just be a person who rides a bike.
    My route gradually changed from the vehicular route to the bike route just a few minutes different.
    For two years I haven’t touched the cyclist wear I am not a cyclist.
    I ride a bike 5 days a week, 8 miles twice a day, through all weathers.
    I usually ride my bike in easy fit casual trainers, thick socks, cargo shorts, an under tee shirt, a seersucker short sleeved shirt and a rainproof jacket if it’s wet or cold.
    I have a change to work clothes at work or in the panniers.

  3. Depends on the time of year really.

    Once the nights close in, I switch to a shorter multi-modal commute by Brompton. for that, I wear work shirt, fleece/waterproof and old jeans with hiking boots (change into work trousers and shoes once I arrive).

    Spring through Autumn, I commute a longer distance, in “performance” (ha!) gear (although I wear MTB style baggies, not lycra shorts) and get changed at work. I’m quite jealous of Jupe having the option to take a less frantic route – there are parts of my commute like that, but not all (yet) sadly.

    I ticked “performance” in the poll, because that’s for most of the year.

    • Thanks for your comment, John.

      I seem to have a go at ‘performance’ gear a lot, but there certainly is a time and a place for it and can become a bit of a necessity for longer journeys. Thanks for voting.

      Happy cycling,
      Pete

  4. I started commuting on a road bike, wore performance clothing and carried my clothes in a backpack because it was what I had at the time. Changing my clothes before each trip to and from the office got old and running errands in my office clothes on a road bike wasn’t very easy. So I got a bike that was conducive for riding around town (an upright mixte frame with fenders and racks) which meant I could wear whatever I was wearing for the day.

    I prefer to ride in skirts or dresses, boots and heels (surprisingly, ballet flats have proven the be worst) even through the winter and in the rain (there’s a method to my madness). I just layer up with tights, scarves and a vest or light jacket for winter. Most of the clothes in my closet work for riding on the bike and my least favorite are slacks. I’ve had friends comment that they’ve never seen me in pants because when I wear slacks, it means I did not get there by bike LOL.

    I would wear clothes designed for cyclists’ needs but there are very few in the market…especially for women. Many options that are available are too sporty, too casual (either the style or the material) for me or miss the mark in features…the benefits are too marginal for the cost and there’s a close substitute in my closet that would work. There are a few brands that I would suggest: Betabrand (Bike to Work), Ligne 8 and I would have loved to try Iva Jeans’ Reveal Skirt.

  5. Stuart says:

    I wear my work shirt from yesterday. And then shower at work and put a new one on.

  6. Sam says:

    So I really don’t like having to carry stuff around, and I cycle only short distances to/from the station.

    But I work and socialise in London and so I like having the ability to just jump on a bike whenever and wherever.

    For that I need clothing that works both socially, at work, and on a bike – hence I ticked ‘cyclists needs but with more style’. I’m not very organised so don’t like the idea of having to arrange to bring in shirts every day/week.

    I’m also frequently fairly late to work so I don’t like having to spend more time changing at either end of the journey – cycling is my go-to around London as it’s frequently faster than any other form of transport (and a hell of a lot cheaper too).

    But there have been a few times where I’ve been caught in the rain and have spent 40 mins at work standing under the hand dryers in the disabled toilet trying to dry out the thick chinos and work shirts actually on my body.

    So I’ve just gone ahead and taken the plunge to order some ‘SPORK’ bulletproof cycling chinos.

    They’re a lot of money at £130, I have a habit of spending too much, and I did read a review saying they go out of shape fairly easily (it’s annoying that most reviews don’t take into account performance over long periods of time, as this is something crucial to the person who will actually be buying a good) – but I’m still excited to see how they perform.

    If they work well and keep their shape then I can see myself wearing them virtually every day as i’m always cycling and always wanting to look sharp – socially and at work. I’m do have a lit bit of immediate buyers regret after just sploshing £130 on a pair of trousers (God, it sounds even worse when I type it…) but if they’re going to last me 10 years then they will be worth it!

    • Hi Sam,
      Thanks for your comment. I think we’re very similar types of cyclists – it’s about convenience with me too.
      The SPOKE Chinos are really good, although 10 years will be a push if you’re wearing them every day! But they do look good off the bike and are comfy to cycle in – so I think you’ll be happy with them.
      Happy cycling,
      Pete

  1. October 29, 2014

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